Physically Changing Bonobo DNA Into Human DNA (As An Example)

So far we have talked about statistical issues regarding changing one species into another species and we have talked about physical issues inside of cells. This section will drill down very deep into the physical issues inside of cells.

The theory of evolution says that humans "evolved" from some other primate by changing four of their DNA strands. Thus, for two bonobos to become two humans, four bonobo DNA strands (i.e. the sequence of nucleotides) must change into four human DNA strands as we have talked about.

But let us dig much deeper into the issue of physically changing the sequence of nucleotides on DNA in order to create a new species from an old species.

These random, mindless changes to DNA are sometimes called "copy errors," but of course DNA damage does not have to occur during copying a DNA strand. "Evolution" assumes they can occur at any time even though cells take very good care of their DNA. So let us talk about random changes to a DNA strand!!!

For example, in order to change the DNA of one species (bonobo DNA) into the DNA of a new and improved species (human DNA), millions of segments of DNA (on the bonobo DNA) would need to be moved, deleted and/or created from scratch on each of the four bonobo DNA strands in order to create four new and improved human DNA strands!!!

And after these massive blind, deaf and brain-dead changes are made, the four new human DNA strands must align with each other at the function level. But let us focus on one of the bonobo DNA strands.

As an example, let's look at a single "move" of a section/segment of DNA (on the bonobo DNA) to a specific location on the new human DNA strand (i.e. as part of changing bonobo DNA into human DNA):
1) It would take two "cuts" of the DNA strand (on the bonobo DNA) to isolate a segment of DNA to be moved,
2) The new location where the segment would go (on the new human DNA) would require one cut to make room for the new segment in an exact location,
3) One "join" (i.e. reconnecting the bonobo DNA segment because a segment was cut out) is needed to put the bonobo DNA strand back together,
4) Two "joins" would be needed to connect the bonobo segment of DNA endpoints to the new human DNA strand.

You might want to read that last paragraph a couple of more tmes.

And as part of this, changes must be made to both bonobo male DNA strands and a different set of changes must be made to both bonobo female DNA strands, meaning the same changes (or close to it) must be made to create both new human male DNA strands and both new human female DNA strands so the new human male DNA and new human female DNA will align with each other at the function level!!!

Let us dig deeper!!!

These are the four new human DNA strands which are needed for a new species - humans.

Remember, we are modifying a bonobo DNA strand into a human DNA strand.


Case 1: Some sections of bonobo DNA would not be needed by the human DNA. Thus we need to cut out many segments of DNA from the new human DNA strand (i.e. the bonobo DNA strand we are modifying) and then join the new male human DNA strand back together where a segment was cut out.

The two endpoints of the segment to be removed would require two cuts of the bonobo DNA strand (to isolate the segment to be cut out) and one join would be needed to put the new human DNA strand back together.


Case 2: Moving a segment of bonobo DNA into a new location for the new human DNA strand.

The two endpoints of each segment to be moved would require two cuts of the bonobo DNA strand (to isolate the segment to be cut out) and one join to put the new human DNA strand back together.

Another cut is required where the segment will be put in. The segment we took from another location must then be put in the new area. This requires two joins to put the segment into the new location.

Now note at this point that the segment being put on the new human DNA strand, when joined, must "point in the right direction." In other words, suppose a segment ACGGTCC was moved from bonobo DNA to the new human DNA (it is the same DNA strand as we are changing a bonobo DNA strand into a human DNA strand). But let us suppose as it was floating around in the human cell that it was accidently put in backwards so that the new area where the segment was placed on the new human DNA strand had the segment CCTGGCA.

That would cause a problem. And if many segments were "moved" there would be many cases where the segment went in backwards. This case is another problem for "evolution."

ACTUALLY, THIS ISSUE IS DEADLY TO THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION BECAUSE: as these segments are blindly floating around inside the cell, mathematically half (i.e. 50%) of all bonobo DNA segments would be put in backwards when creating the four human DNA strands!!!! This is a statistical fact!!!


Case 3: New DNA segments that were not on the bonobo DNA strand.

There would clearly need to be many, many new segments of DNA which were not on the bonobo DNA strand!!! How did new segments for the new human DNA strand, which did not exist on the bonobo DNA strand (and thus did not come from the bonobo DNA strand), get created inside of the new human cell???

Where did these nucleotides come from and how did they form into new segments while inside of a cell??

And these new segments must be pointed in the right direction whhen they are put onto the new human DNA strand in the correct location!!

However, if new segments were needed, most of the new segments would not have a useful sequence of nucleotides to go on the new human DNA (remember we need to be creating four new human DNA strands)!!! What do we do with the new segments which were not needed on the new human???


Comments: At the peak of this process the original DNA strand would be floating around in millions of different pieces and some of the segments would not be needed by the human DNA (but they were needed by the bonobo).

And all of these millions of changes to bonobo DNA must happen to each of four bonobo DNA strands!!! But the changes will not be identical for all four DNA strands. Only two of them could be identical with each other (the two female DNA strands).

 


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